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  1. How did Hitler come to power?Several conditions, in German, gave Adolf Hitler and his Nazi party the chance to rise to power in the 1930s (Fischer, 2011). These conditions included the economic depression that had hit the country for quite a good number of years in an enormous way hence, forcing millions of people out of work. Again, many Germans faced humiliation of defeat 15 years earlier during the World War I hence, they had no confidence in their weak government-Weimar Republic (Fischer, 2011). Hitler’s spellbinding and powerful ability attracted many Germans who were desperate for political change they wanted him to be their leader with immediate effect. Hitler further had large amounts of financial resources that he had acquired from wealthy businesspersons that enabled him to carry out his propaganda and elections campaigns in a simple way. According to Brustein (2007), Hitler promised his followers a better life and employment opportunities to the youth and middle class’ members. As a result, Nazis party managed to win 33 percent of the total votes in the 1932 elections, even though this party was unknown before the economic depression struck the country (Brustein, 2007). In fact, Hitler was appointed as the head of the government in German, in 1933, and many people viewed him as a savior for their country.

Fischer,K.P. (2011). Hitlerand America.New York: Universityof Pennsylvania Press.

Brustein,B. (2007).WhoJoined the Nazis and Why. AmericanJournal of Sociology,103, (1), 216-221.

2.Discussthe Einstein`s letter, and the impact the atomic bomb had on WorldWar II

Einsteinwrote a letter and addressed it to President Roosevelt informing himof possible actions that he and other scientists were about toundertake he disclosed in his letter that they were about to purifyuranium 235 (U-235) for Nazi Germany (Winkler, 2010). The chemicalcould then be used to create an atomic bomb. He advised the U.S toget the already made atomic bomb to stop the German Nazis thepresident and his committee agreed to Einstein’s advice. The U.Sgovernment took immediate step and started building Manhattan projectwith an aim of researching and producing an atomic bomb. Followingthis, the Manhattan project was created plus three atom bombs. Jones(2007) acknowledges that Einstein did not like the idea and thoughtof nuclear bombs that were being made as well as their use since hewas well aware of the devastating effects they would have on humanbeings and the environment. Jones (2007) findings show that atomicbomb brought an end to World War II. U.S dropped the first atomicbomb, on August 6 1945, on Japanese city of Hiroshima and a secondone was detonated at Nagasaki forcing the government to end the war(Davis, 2006). It also scared other nations like China and the SovietUnion from fighting combatively against the U.S government.

Davis,W. (2006). Backgroundof Atomic Bomb. TheScience News-Letter,49 (25), 394-395.

Jones,C.V (2007). Manhattan:The Army and the Atomic Bomb.Reviewsin American History,15(4), 680-685.

Winkler,A. (2010). Buildingthe Bomb: The Army and the Manhattan Project.Oxford: Oxford University Press.

3.Why was the fall of the Shaw of Iran so important to current events?

Bekker(2004) argue that the fall of the Shaw of Iran paved way for ease ofstrained relations between Iran and the U.S. The relations that existbetween these two nations are chiefly due to the security ofinternational community as well as due to the energy interests thatmany countries have in Iran. According to Bekker (2004), more thantwenty percent of world oil supply finds its way through the Straiton a daily basis. If tense relations still exist between these twonations, then Iran would retaliate by disrupting or closing trafficin the Strait of Hormuz. As a result, an armed confrontation woulderupt between Iran and the U.S hence, attracting the entire MiddleEast region. Therefore, fall of the Shaw of Iran has immenselycontributed to the amicable relationship that exists between thesetwo countries.

Bekker,H.P. (2004). Oil Platforms (Iran v.United States). New York: BaronsPress.

4.The impact of Kennedy`s death on the country.Kennedy’s death made majority of Americans citizen to rely onTV as their primary source of news. However, prior to Kennedy’sdeath most Americans relied on newspapers as their primary source ofnews for over 200 years. Edwards (2008) posits that 55 percent ofAmericans rely on TV as their primary source of news. The deathfurther brought a permanent distrust in federal government mostAmerica cannot fully trust their own federal government even thoughmany years have passed since Kennedy’s death. Majority of Americansconservatives and libertarians criticized the Warren Commission thatwas tasked with the investigation of Kennedy’s death. The immediateresults of Kennedy’s death in Washington brought about the mostprogressive eras of legislation in U.S history even though mostAmericans developed a permanent distrust of federal government fordecades to come (Edwards, 2008). Additionally, most American believedthat Kennedy’s death led to an escalation of American militarypresence in the Vietnam War. Likewise, his death gave a new dawn ofconspiracies era since most people could not accept the simplicity ofthe assassination. In fact, most radical leftists believed that themilitary industrial complex had a hand in Kennedy’s death. Edwards(2008) findings show that 6 out of 10 Americas still believe in someKennedy assassination conspiracy theory today.

Edwards,G. (2008). PresidentialLegislative Skills as a Source of Influence in Congress.PresidentialStudies Quarterly,10 (2), 211-223.

5.Why was the story of Elvis Presley so important to music, television,and race relations?

Elvisis a well renowned person in the history of rolls and rock music. Herevolutionized music and had a great influence and change on theentertainment industry (Hampton, 2008). Elvis produced and releasedhis first single on Sun Records. His single played a key role inshowing that both black and white music could live side by side, eventhough most black and white artists of the song found it hard to liveamidst one another. Indeed, his song played a key role in integratingand bringing both white and black culture into one neat package,which would bring enormous influence on many Americans (Glenn, 2003).Racial realties of the mid-1950s were demonstrated by the fact themelding or integration of white and black culture occurred throughthe voice of a white teenager (Hampton, 2008). White audiences werenot ready to embrace any music that was actually performed byAfrican-American artists even though they may have been ready forRock and Roll that was inspired by such artists. In fact, radioaudiences who were enthusiastic to first air Presley first singleensured that he let his listeners know that Presley was a white(Hampton, 2008). He also appeared on various TV show like MiltonBerle show and Steve Allen’s new Sunday night variety program.Hampton (2008) notes that Presley had many followers especially theyoung people who watched any TV show that he ventured in’ His TVappearances made him popular all over the country hence, he decidedto begin his career in Hollywood, where he indulged in the moviemaking business in an enormous way (Glenn, 2003).

Hampton,W. (2008). ElvisPresley.Up Close. London: Pu$n.

Glenn,A. (2003). AllShook Up: How Rock n’ Roll Changed America.Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press6.Discuss the deaths of the three civil rights workers

Threeyoung civil rights workers, James Chaney a twenty first year oldblack from Mississippi Andrew Goodman a twenty year old white fromNew York, and Michal Schwerner- a twenty four year old white from NewYork, were found dead near Philadelphia (Nelson, 2011). Prior totheir death, the three had been dedicating their time and effort toregister black voters during Freedom Summer as well as investigatingthe burning of a black church in Mississippi (Brunner, 2012). Theywere murdered by Ku Klux Klan a few hours after their imprisonmentand release by the police on trumped-up charges. Later, a court oflaw proved that Neshoba County’s law enforcement conspired with theKu Klux Klan to murder the trio. Following this, the FBI arrestedeighteen men in October 1964 however, state prosecutors did not trythe case claiming that it lacked substantial evidence. Bartley (2001)findings indicated that the 18 arrested in connection with the murderof the three civil rights were only arrested after interventions fromthe federal government. 7 men were convicted on charges of federalconspiracy and were sentenced to three to ten years in jail (Bartley,2001). Nevertheless, nobody was tried on the murder or charge. Later,on January 2005 an eighty year old man- Edgar Ray Killen, was chargedwith the murder of the trio (Nelson, 2011). Several accusations werehauled against him he was accused of assembling the men that killedthe three men. He was later sentenced to 60 years in prison.

Bartley,N.V. (2001). RacialMatters: The FBI`s Secret File on Black America, 1960-1972.Cambridge: Cambridge University.

Brunner,B. (2012).TheMurders of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner.Retrievedfromhttp://www.infoplease.com/spot/bhmjustice4.html.

Nelson,J. (2011). TheCivil Rights Movement: A Press Perspective. HumanRights,28(4), 3-6.

References

Bartley,N.V. (2001). RacialMatters: The FBI`s Secret File on Black America, 1960-1972.Cambridge: Cambridge University.

Bekker,H.P. (2004). Oil Platforms (Iran v.United States). New York: BaronsPress.

Brunner,B. (2012).TheMurders of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner.Retrievedfromhttp://www.infoplease.com/spot/bhmjustice4.html.

Brustein,B. (2007).WhoJoined the Nazis and Why. AmericanJournal of Sociology,103, (1), 216-221.

Davis,W. (2006). Backgroundof Atomic Bomb. TheScience News-Letter,49 (25), 394-395.

Edwards,G. (2008). PresidentialLegislative Skills as a Source of Influence in Congress.PresidentialStudies Quarterly,10 (2), 211-223.

Fischer,K.P. (2011). Hitlerand America.New York: Universityof Pennsylvania Press.

Glenn,A. (2003). AllShook Up: How Rock n’ Roll Changed America.Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press.

Hampton,W. (2008). ElvisPresley.Up Close. London: Pu$n.

Jones,C.V (2007). Manhattan:The Army and the Atomic Bomb.Reviewsin American History,15(4), 680-685.

Nelson,J. (2011). TheCivil Rights Movement: A Press Perspective. HumanRights,28(4), 3-6.

Winkler,A. (2010). Buildingthe Bomb: The Army and the Manhattan Project.Oxford: Oxford University Press.